Weekly outline

    • Progression opportunities through Pearson qualifications

      Learners who have achieved this qualification can progress to other related security qualifications, should they wish to change career, such as the BTEC level 2 Working as a Security Officer within the Private Security Industry. They can also progress into a level 3 qualification such as BTEC level 3 Working as a Close Protection Operative in the Private Security Industry, having already completed the conflict management unit, which can also be used as recognition of prior learning.
      Unit Unit refference number Mandatory unit name level credit GLH
      1 T/616/8518

      Working as a Door Supervisor within the Private Security Industry

      2 1 12
      2

      K/506/7176

      Working within the Private Security Industry

      2 1 1
      3

      Y/506/7125

      Conflict Management within the Private Security Industry

      2 1 8
      4

      A/616/8619

      Physical Intervention Skills within the Private Security Industry

      2 2 12

    • Requirements relating to SIA licensing

      It is a criminal offence to undertake the licensable activities of a door supervisor without an SIA licence. A licence is required for anyone who undertakes manned guarding activities in relation to a licensed premises. The SIA states that a door supervisor licence is required if you are performing this guarding activity on behalf of yourself or your employer or if your services are supplied for the purposes of or in connection with any contract to a consumer.

      The following standards are set out for the SIA in their Door Supervisor specifications. A door supervisor should at all times:

      • wear clothing which is smart, presentable, easily identifies the individual as a door supervisor, and is in accordance with the employer’s guidelines

      • wear his/her SIA licence on the outside of their clothing while on duty, displaying the photograph side. The licence must not be altered.

      The role and objectives of the door supervisor.
      A door supervisor needs to be flexible and adaptable and be able to deal with any situation they come across in the course of their day-to- day working life. However, there are common roles and key tasks that you will be expected to deal with on a more frequent basis.
       
      Role Description

      Control of access

      It is your role to ensure that the people entering the premises you are responsible for are legitimate customers and the venue does not breach its overall capacity. This role also includes ensuring customers are not carrying prohibited items
      such as weapons or drugs when they enter the premises.

      Enforcement

      You will be required to enforce the law, your company’s policies and the venue’s entry conditions as a key part of your role. This may include preventing prohibited items coming into the premises as mentioned above, ensuring a dress code is applied and removing people who have broken the law or the rules of the venue.

      Ensuring safety and security

      A key part of your role as a door supervisor is ensuring the safety and security of the venue and the staff and customers within it. This includes routine safety measures such as weapon and
      drugs searches, as well as dealing with alcohol- related violence and providing first aid when required. However it also includes response to serious emergency incidents such as bomb threats, terrorist activity and firearms incidents.

      Prevention of crime, disorder and unacceptable behaviour

      The prevention of crime and disorder is an essential element of the job of a door supervisor. It is likely that you will work as part of a well-trained team along with the police to reduce disorder both inside and outside your venue

       

      Key qualities of a door supervisor.

      In order to be an effective door supervisor you will need a range of key skills and qualities which will enable you to provide the public with the service they expect and help you to maintain the good reputation of your employer.

      Oral communication – You need to be able to communicate verbally with your customers. Your job role is all about customer interaction and you are often the public face of your venue. As well as ensuring the premises and public are safe you also play a key marketing role. If your communication is poor, people may choose to avoid your club or pub meaning a loss of revenue for your employer. You will also struggle to resolve conflict if you cannot communicate verbally.

      Interpersonal and teamworking skills – Door supervisors rarely work alone: it is likely you will be part of a team of door supervisors. You will also be part of the general staff of the venue including bar staff, kitchen staff, managers and cleaning staff who must all work together to ensure premises are fit for the public. You will rely heavily on your colleagues to alert you to potential conflict and to support you if you are dealing with conflict. Therefore sound teamworking skills and interpersonal behaviour will be critical to your success in the role.

      Quick thinking and decisiveness – In a busy entertainment venue, emergency or conflict situations can occur without warning in the space of seconds. You must be flexible and adaptable enough to make decisions quickly and respond to situations on the spot. If you cannot do this, conflict may escalate into outright violence and an emergency could go unchecked leaving people injured – or worse – as a result.

      Politeness and courtesy – Remember that you are the public face of your venue. You are the one the customer may see before anyone else. If you are rude or aggressive the customers will go elsewhere with a consequent loss of revenue to your employer. Treat people coming to your venue as you would wish to be treated if you were on a night out and always treat your customers with courtesy and politeness even in the most difficult of circumstances.

      Assertiveness and calmness under pressure – As a door supervisor you will need to be assertive about what standards of behaviour and conduct you expect from your customers and have the ability to remain calm even when aggressively challenged. Aggression and tension shown by you can escalate a conflict situation whereas calmness can often defuse it.

      Honesty and fairness – These are skills required in all jobs where you are dealing with the public, including the work of a door supervisor. You will be dealing with legal matters and the police on a regular basis and it is important that you report the facts in a fair and honest way if you are to help uphold the law. You will also be dealing with conflict and being fair to all concerned is a good tool to use in conflict resolution.

      Observation skills – The ability to observe a crowded environment and notice anything which looks out of place, or identify a trouble spot before it happens, is a key quality required of a door supervisor. By observing carefully you can prevent issues before they arise and save yourself time and your employer money in the process.

      Requirement.


      Participant must have communicative English. an inigtial assessment will caried out before joing the course.

       

      Fees: £149.99


    • Requirements relating to SIA licensing

      It is a criminal offence to undertake the licensable activities of a door supervisor without an SIA licence. A licence is required for anyone who undertakes manned guarding activities in relation to a licensed premises. The SIA states that a door supervisor licence is required if you are performing this guarding activity on behalf of yourself or your employer or if your services are supplied for the purposes of or in connection with any contract to a consumer.

      The following standards are set out for the SIA in their Door Supervisor specifications. A door supervisor should at all times:

      • wear clothing which is smart, presentable, easily identifies the individual as a door supervisor, and is in accordance with the employer’s guidelines

      • wear his/her SIA licence on the outside of their clothing while on duty, displaying the photograph side. The licence must not be altered.

      The role and objectives of the door supervisor.
      A door supervisor needs to be flexible and adaptable and be able to deal with any situation they come across in the course of their day-to- day working life. However, there are common roles and key tasks that you will be expected to deal with on a more frequent basis.
       
      Role Description

      Control of access

      It is your role to ensure that the people entering the premises you are responsible for are legitimate customers and the venue does not breach its overall capacity. This role also includes ensuring customers are not carrying prohibited items
      such as weapons or drugs when they enter the premises.

      Enforcement

      You will be required to enforce the law, your company’s policies and the venue’s entry conditions as a key part of your role. This may include preventing prohibited items coming into the premises as mentioned above, ensuring a dress code is applied and removing people who have broken the law or the rules of the venue.

      Ensuring safety and security

      A key part of your role as a door supervisor is ensuring the safety and security of the venue and the staff and customers within it. This includes routine safety measures such as weapon and
      drugs searches, as well as dealing with alcohol- related violence and providing first aid when required. However it also includes response to serious emergency incidents such as bomb threats, terrorist activity and firearms incidents.

      Prevention of crime, disorder and unacceptable behaviour

      The prevention of crime and disorder is an essential element of the job of a door supervisor. It is likely that you will work as part of a well-trained team along with the police to reduce disorder both inside and outside your venue

       

      Key qualities of a door supervisor.

      In order to be an effective door supervisor you will need a range of key skills and qualities which will enable you to provide the public with the service they expect and help you to maintain the good reputation of your employer.

      Oral communication – You need to be able to communicate verbally with your customers. Your job role is all about customer interaction and you are often the public face of your venue. As well as ensuring the premises and public are safe you also play a key marketing role. If your communication is poor, people may choose to avoid your club or pub meaning a loss of revenue for your employer. You will also struggle to resolve conflict if you cannot communicate verbally.

      Interpersonal and teamworking skills – Door supervisors rarely work alone: it is likely you will be part of a team of door supervisors. You will also be part of the general staff of the venue including bar staff, kitchen staff, managers and cleaning staff who must all work together to ensure premises are fit for the public. You will rely heavily on your colleagues to alert you to potential conflict and to support you if you are dealing with conflict. Therefore sound teamworking skills and interpersonal behaviour will be critical to your success in the role.

      Quick thinking and decisiveness – In a busy entertainment venue, emergency or conflict situations can occur without warning in the space of seconds. You must be flexible and adaptable enough to make decisions quickly and respond to situations on the spot. If you cannot do this, conflict may escalate into outright violence and an emergency could go unchecked leaving people injured – or worse – as a result.

      Politeness and courtesy – Remember that you are the public face of your venue. You are the one the customer may see before anyone else. If you are rude or aggressive the customers will go elsewhere with a consequent loss of revenue to your employer. Treat people coming to your venue as you would wish to be treated if you were on a night out and always treat your customers with courtesy and politeness even in the most difficult of circumstances.

      Assertiveness and calmness under pressure – As a door supervisor you will need to be assertive about what standards of behaviour and conduct you expect from your customers and have the ability to remain calm even when aggressively challenged. Aggression and tension shown by you can escalate a conflict situation whereas calmness can often defuse it.

      Honesty and fairness – These are skills required in all jobs where you are dealing with the public, including the work of a door supervisor. You will be dealing with legal matters and the police on a regular basis and it is important that you report the facts in a fair and honest way if you are to help uphold the law. You will also be dealing with conflict and being fair to all concerned is a good tool to use in conflict resolution.

      Observation skills – The ability to observe a crowded environment and notice anything which looks out of place, or identify a trouble spot before it happens, is a key quality required of a door supervisor. By observing carefully you can prevent issues before they arise and save yourself time and your employer money in the process.

      Requirement.


      Participant must have communicative English. an inigtial assessment will caried out before joing the course.

       

      Fees: £149.99


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